English visitor

The English version of this website is currently under construction. For information about our activities you can contact us at:

Email: info@servicebureau.nl
Telephone: +31 40 290 51 00

Thanks for your understanding.

Bart Jansen
Director

English visitor

The English version of this website is currently under construction. For information about our activities you can contact us at:

Email: info@servicebureau.nl
Telephone: +31 40 290 51 00

Thanks for your understanding.

Bart Jansen
Director

A recall: what is it and what does it entail?

Below we explain what a recall (the retrieval of products) actually entails and how to set up a good recall emergency plan.

A recall: what should you do?

You will be familiar with recall examples from the past: the Philips Senseo which was recalled because there was a risk that various components would end up flying around the kitchen. It turned out that lime scale build-up in a valve meant that pressure in the device could not escape. Philips decided to recall millions of devices from all over the world.

Customers were given an opportunity to request a descaling set. After that they received a box which they could use to return the device. Philips replaced the boiler in the device and the Senseo was then ready to be sent back to the customer. This recall project lasted a couple of weeks and cost a considerable amount of money. However, prevention is obviously better than a cure.

Then there was the lead paint used on children's toys by Mattel, which also carried out a global recall of all the affected products. Bottles of rosé from the Lidl were recalled because of excess pressure in the bottle and Peijnenburg recalled a batch of gingerbread [ontbijtkoek] due to it possibly containing metal particles, while Honig did the same for a pasta salad due to worries about salmonella. We could mention a whole host of other examples.

Recall: a major and risky undertaking

A recall is a major undertaking, particularly if it has to be carried out nationally or even internationally. It has to be done within a certain period of time, usually as quickly as possible. This means rapid decision-making and, as already mentioned, it can be a costly operation. There are the costs of investigations, recalling the affected products, repairing and returning them, or perhaps destroying them. Then there are the costs of advertisements in the media (something which is, in any event, obligatory in the case of foodstuffs because an announcement of the recall has to be published in several newspapers). The financial consequences of a recall campaign are, however, still always smaller than the loss of confidence in the company in question. This can lead to damage to the company's image, a loss of customers and even bankruptcy. Research has shown that image-related problems can still exist 2 years after the disaster.

SBJ has written a series of articles which will help you reflect on how to draw up a recall plan. Your chances of survival improve if you have a plan in place for whenever it might be necessary. The first step is knowing how to act and to decide who has to take action, when and where. The idea is, of course, for a recall plan to be available but hopefully never to be used.

Recall: which departments do you need to involve?

The fact that various departments within your organisation will be affected means that they have to be involved. In addition to appointing key figures internally, you can also opt to find and engage an external recall partner. Using a specialised recall partner with experience and contacts within the logistical chain and packaging industry will help you find adequate solutions quickly which match your objectives and business formula. SBJ is precisely such a partner and has years of experience in the field of recalls, including internationally. SBJ works with organisations of all shapes and sizes. The series of articles which SBJ has written for you explore, among other things, possible reputational damage in the event of a recall and the points to focus on when it comes to drawing up a plan.

If you would like to find out what SBJ can do for you specifically in the context of drawing up a recall crisis plan either in advance, or at the time of a recall, please feel free to contact Mariëlle Jansen on +31 (0)40 290 51 00 or mail to Mariëlle. She would be only too pleased to arrange an appointment to discuss the risks and the recall solutions.

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